A Tale of Two Loops Update: South Ferry Loop closing soon!

After a combined 108 years of service, the original South Ferry loop station will close once again! Whether it’s tomorrow, Wednesday, or Friday, for that matter the station will close to make way for the replacement station which was damaged during Hurricane Sandy. So today, I took a ride downtown to old stop for old times’ sake. Sadly I didn’t get on the Ferry services, the Governors Island and Staten Island Ferry, that are upstairs due to time constraints. While I will miss it’s eccentric nature, I will so not miss the screeching!

If you want to read the original blog posting click here

So long old South Ferry and thanks for the memories!

 

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Awaiting Departure

 

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Getting On

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Going to miss the classic tiles!

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Train Departing in 5,4,3,2…

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Pulling away from the past into the future

 

Thoughts on Film: “Sully” A solid movie despite some usual biopic hiccups

 

Clint Eastwood’s latest film “Sully,” chronicles the famous ‘Miracle on the Hudson,’ one of the most famous crash landings in the history of flight.

Famous of course, for that everyone from the passengers to the crew survived what was thought to be impossible; landing a plane in the middle of a river, in the freezing cold and in New York City, one of the most densely populated places on earth.

Yet on January 15, 2009, US Airways Flight 1549 bound for Charlotte, did just that. Captain Chesley ‘Sully’ Sullenberger and first officer Jeffery Skiles, played by Tom Hanks and Aaron Eckhart respectively, the plane lands in the Hudson and ‘Sully’ goes from an experienced pilot to an exceptional one.

The film keeps the plot lean by focusing solely on the landing and the subsequent investigation that follows. Eastwood uses the investigation as a framing device to deliver to the audience the famous crash landing not once but twice.

With the plane now out of the freezing waters of the Hudson. The National Transportation Safety Board begins to grill the men for their decision. The inquiry claims that the plane could have made it back to LaGaurdia Airport when one of the engines was not as badly damaged as the men had thought. While Sully tries to explain that it wasn’t possible, one member of the group Charles Porter, a pugnacious Mike O’Malley, digs in.

Faced with the prospect that there was another way to get the passengers to safety, Sully begins to doubt himself. This on top of the surreal and all-too-fast rise to fame makes him feel adrift and isolated, emotions that Hanks captures beautify.

Hanks is also able to convey Sully’s other emotions, but perhaps the most important is the coolness that Sully has about him. Sully rarely raised his voice in the film, he does so once and that’s when he is evacuation the plane and looking to make sure no one is left behind.

The only two cheerleaders in his corner are his wife Lorraine, a concerned Laura Linney and Skiles. Skiles in particular, is adamant that Sully did the right because it was the only thing. That and apparently he didn’t have any ideas on how to land the plane at the moment.

In terms of direction, Eastwood does a wonderful job of recreating the landing. He managed to get the exact boats from the New York Waterway ferry service, which resued the passengers and even one of the pilots, Peter Vincent ‘Vince’ Lombardi, to play himself in the role. Eastwood made the film as accurately as possible even as so far to edit a ring that Sully wears in real life to get the right color.

In the seven years since the landing, the skyline has changed so much that it even made the landing even more astounding.

I myself remember that day, coming home from school and my dad watching the news. I remember the relief I felt when the news broke that all 155 survived the crash. One thing everyone who was on that flight remembers that I do is that it was really cold.

While I’m not sure if “Sully” will get nominated for any Academy Awards, Hanks could very well be an early contender for the award for Best Actor and Eastwood for Director. The film would also do well in the technical department such as Sound and Editing.

The only hiccup is the characterization of the NTSB officials.  Sullenberger himself asked to have the names of the investigators be changed so that they didn’t come off as “prosecutorial,” the fact that they get the tar and feather treatment is a bit unfair.

While Eastwood claimed that as he read the script which depicted the officials ‘railroading’ Sullenberger and Skiles, which put them on the defensive, the real-life investigators were actually astounded by the level of calmness and teamwork the two men had in order to bring the plane to safety.

In fact, the NTSB, which has no regulatory powers in the U.S. government, only makes recommendations. They made 35 safety recommendations as a result of Sullenberger’s historic landing. Even though it’s become practice that some historical aspect is alter to further dramatize the plot, using the NTSB as a scapegoat may create more harm than good when the public, such as myself, are placed in a disaster involving transport.

While I will not damn the film for this, I will advise a word of caution on biopics and for anyone who has seen or yet to see the film. Filmmakers like, Eastwood are amazing at what they do, including creating narratives for an audience to follow. However perception has a funny way of becoming reality for some people. We should be as if not more so because as the old adage goes, you can’t believe everything you read or see these days.

Grade A-

Sully is rated PG-13, Plane landing in the Hudson, ’nuff said.

Top Lines:  

“I would have done it in July”: Last line in the film uttered by Jeffery Skiles.

“The best way to leave from LaGaurdia is to fly from JFK”:  Donna the stewardess as the flight taxis off the runway.

“40 years in the air but in the end and I’m going to be judged on 208 seconds” Sully.

 

A tale of two loops: City Hall and South Ferry, A ‘City I love project’

In this post about this great metropolis, I’m heading deep underground to two of New York City’s interesting subway stations; City Hall and South Ferry. The reason why they are interesting is because they are not exactly in a straight line.

In fact, they are loops.

The first is one of the most beautiful underground spaces in New York. The second station, while a bit simpler, has managed to last the test of time and even get a second life.

But first a throwback.

City Hall before opening day. image from viewing.nyc

It’s 1900 and the first shovel spade is dug into the earth in front of City Hall on March 24th of that year. The planned 9 mile subway line would stretch from City Hall up to the booming neighborhood of Harlem.

The City Hall stop was to be used for local trains running to Harlem and later on The Bronx. While express trains would continue to Brooklyn. If you are wondering why that was the case, consider the fact that Broadway is a very narrow street and it would have been expensive to dig a four-track subway under Broadway. They would have to widened the street which would have lead to the loss of valuable real estate and cost more money.

To convince people to go underground, the newly formed Interborough Rapid Transit company, hired the architectural firm Heins and LaFarge to design the tilework for City Hall and the other stations on the inaugural line. The firm, in turn, hired Rafael Guastavino and his tile company for the sole purpose of tiling City Hall.

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View of the ceiling

Guastavino is often referred to as a genius in his designs. Using tiles that were layered like a cake, Guastavino’s tiles were considered structurally superior to traditional Roman Barrel style Arches that required the use of large stones to support the arch.

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Guastavino’s tiles at work

It was a cheaper and by all accounts more attractive method of construction. While Guastavino tiles usually come in white or eggshell, the station has a beautiful green and orange poly-chrome tiles that are pleasing to the eye.

The station also has a Guastavino hallmark. Since the tiles are layered the ones that are not used for display would have have had groove like striations on the tile to place the grout. When Guastavino was in his workshop one day, a client for another job remarked that the pattern was perfect and it has been placed on almost every tile ever since.

The station is also a massive feat of engineering. The station alone sits on a 147 degree angle. This was done to accommodate the City Hall building itself and the former Post Office that sat on the southern edge of the park. The tracks also had to go under the express trains that were heading to Brooklyn.

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Inside the City Hall station

City Hall and the other stations on the line opened to the public on October 27, 1904. A ceremony was held at the station and as the legend goes Mayor George B. McClellan Jr., so intoxicated by controlling the train, he refused to give up the controls until the train reached 103rd Street, 7 miles away.

Passenger and guests of the ceremony were treated to not only the tiles but chandelier fixtures and skylights.

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Favorite piece of the station the Skylight

However despite the station putting on a good show for the 15,000 ticketed guests, the next day the station was nearly empty.

It would be the station’s fate for the next four decades until it closed to traffic on December 31, 1945, at 9 p.m. with little fanfare save for an obituary like report in the New York Times.

The average daily ridership was around 600 and the station closed early when local service was sent to our next location. The South Ferry Station.

They were other factors that lead to the closure of City Hall as well. The limited amount of space between City Hall and the Post Office building, the inability to expand the station and the aforementioned close proximity of the Brooklyn Bridge station lead to the stations rather small ridership.

The South Ferry stop is located near the Battery, a local city park. The Battery is where you pick up ferries either leading to the Statue of Liberty, Staten Island and now Governors Island. The area has long been a transit hub in one way or another when back in the day all of Manhattan’s elevated trains, the 2nd, 3rd, 6th and 9th Avenue elevated trains all terminated here.

Elevated Station at South Ferry

The South Ferry stop first opened on July 10, 1905. Over the years a variety of services, from the original subway line to a mix of both the present day Lexington and 7th Avenue IRT lines. In 1918, after the 7th Avenue line was completed a second inner loop platform was constructed for extra Lexington Avenue trains at rush hour. After 1977, the station became exclusively a 7th Avenue station when a rush hour shuttle service and late night 6 train service ended due to lack of ridership and budget cuts.

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Tiles demarcating South Ferry in the Serif font

The inner loop station was known for only using the central door for passenger access due to the extremely sharp curve. To lessen the noise, the station was walled with only door slots.

The outer loop was also designed by the firm of Heins and LaFarge. Stations like City Hall and South Ferry used different color patterns or styles and different symbols to help riders on their journey’s. This was to help immigrants, who had limited command of the English language. A boat was to symbolize that one could get off and take the ferry.

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While, City Hall station remained closed and forgotten, South Ferry dutifully did it’s role in the commuting patterns of New Yorkers for generations. Unlike City Hall, which was too close to the neighboring Brooklyn Bridge station, which was connected to the elevated trains to Brooklyn, South Ferry had the Staten Island Ferry, which remains the most direct way to reach the borough of Staten Island without a car.

Over the years the IRT and subsequent transit agency’s that inherited the station didn’t really pursue any major changes to the station. Other than perhaps the occasional renovation or two, trains continued to screech around the curve.

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1 train returning uptown. Notice the gap fillers and the fences around the platform to prevent passengers from falling. 

Compared to City Hall, the South Ferry Loop stop had an altogether different fate. The American’s with Disabilities Act came in the 1990’s. Dictating that public facilities had to accommodate people’s with disabilities, it became clear that the station had to be upgraded due to it’s proximity to the ferry. Unfortunately, for the old loop an extension was not in the cards. Instead, a new station was built underneath the old one. This allowed for the connection of the ‘R’ line. A connection that was previously never attempted.

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Diagram of the South Ferry area with new station.

The new station, which opened in 2009, was equipped with the much needed elevators, a better ventilation system and a platform for the entire train. Compared to the original station however, the replacement left little to the imagination and looked very dull. One bright spot was a piece of the original fort wall was excavated and preserved for passengers to look at.

The old station was closed down and was used for storage of trains during non peak periods and for a time, tours from the Transit Museum. That all changed when an unexpected event gave the old loop station a second life.

Due to the already existing infrastructure at South Ferry, the MTA decided to dig deeper for the new station, however this leaves the new station vulnerable to major storms. Case in point Hurricane Sandy. It flooded the new station up to the ceiling and destroyed equipment needed to send trains into and out of the station.

The older station, while flooded, was surprisingly undamaged. The April of the following year the old loop reopened as a replacement until the new station is rebuilt from scratch, with the necessary hurricane proofing to prevent future service disruptions.

In a strange bit of irony, if the new station wasn’t built, the old loop stop would have borne the brunt of the damage.

So while Staten Island commuters have to contend with the screech for another year, I like the idea of looking at the old tiles all for the price of a subway fare.

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Platform View 

As for City Hall there are only two ways to get there either via a tour by the museum which requires full membership. Photography is allowed but it’s advised to be mindful about using flash photography and no tripods.

You can go to the Transit Museums website for more information.

The second option is to take the 6 train itself. Over the years the MTA has relaxed its ban on people staying on the train beyond Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall. They only request that you stay inside the train as a safety precaution due to the sharp curve. Its fast but if your in town on a day that is not the tour it will do the trick. Try to go in the afternoon to get the skylight effect.

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6 train passing through. Here’s my failed attempt at long exposure shot.

As someone who has done both, the tour is worth the $50.00 due to simply because you’re in the station for at least 45 minutes and despite the noise you can appreciate the station’s full beauty.

While City Hall’s future is secured South Ferry’s third act is yet to be determined. It’s possible they might return to giving tours of the station but they will be one thing missing.

The screech.

 

New York’s New Green Space: Liberty Park

In the last 15 years, New York has seen a vigorous expansion of new or reinvented public spaces. From the High Line to Brooklyn Bridge Park, these re-purposed spaces from their industrial past have proven to be assets to the city’s hunger for space.

Liberty Park is a reinvented space but for a different reason; the events of September 11th.

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Liberty Park looking to the west.

When the original World Trade Center was created, the former Austin J. Tobin Plaza was a wide albeit barren space that had more concrete than green. Looking at older photos prior to writing this I realized the missed opportunities of that space but for it’s time it was perhaps the gold standard in modernist design. Simple, rational and spartan.

As a result, Liberty Park has two jobs; one is to provide suitable open space to the people who work, live and visit the Lower Manhattan area and two restore a form of public space that was lost due to 9/11 and the creation of the memorial.

Liberty Park combines the site of two former structures from pre-9/11 Lower Manhattan. The first, the St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, was the only structure to be destroyed in the 9/11 attacks that was not part of the World Trade Center complex. It also held a separate distinction as the only religious structure to also be destroyed for St. Paul’s Chapel is opposite the site to the est.

The second, the Deutsche Bank Building, had to demolished due to structural damage. I watched over the decade as they slowly demolished the 40-story structure. The three blocks that the two structures existed upon were merged to create a underground parking lot for the new World Trade Center complex.

On top of the parking lot’s entrance is Liberty Park. The park, which opened on June the 30th, was built by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and designed by landscape architect Joseph E. Brown. The park, which is approximately one acre, is a much needed portion of green space in an area where there is very little.

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Man Looking at the 9/11 Memorial from Liberty Park.

The park overlooks the 9/11 Memorial and the rest of the World Trade Center campus to the north, the former World Financial Center, now called Brookfield Place, to the west and one of my personal favorite skyscraper’s in Lower Manhattan, 1 Wall Street in the east.

The most unique aspect is the living wall. It’s a wall of plants that is 20 feet high and is mix of periwinkle, Japanese spurge, sedge, Baltic ivy, and Winter creeper. The benches are made of what appears to be wood are nice, wide and comfortable to sit on.

On the southwest corner of the park sits the America’s Response Monument, dedicated to the troops who were part of the Special Forces team that were the first to be deployed in Afghanistan. The image of a man on the horse stems from the unique aspect of Afghanistan’s geography. With no suitable way to get across terrain, 12 members were given horses by local tribesman friendly to the U.S.

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America’s Response Monument

Despite that only two members knew how to ride a horse, the team accepted the idea and with the assistance of the tribes, they drove the Taliban from the area. The fact that a group of 21st century soldiers, using what was thought to be an outdated form of warfare to defeat an enemy showed the strength and agility of the U.S. military.

The memorial, it should be noted is the first memorial dedicated to members of our special forces that will be open to the public, was dedicated in 2011. It initially was placed at Brookfield Place and then shunted next to the One World Trade Center but behind a construction fence. So I’m thankful that it’s in a better spot.

The view will give visitors a new perspective of the memorial but also give residents a place to get away from the hubbub of the memorial below.

A worthy alternative indeed.

 

Of Orchid’s and Cherry Blossoms.

It’s Spring in New York City and that means that days are getting longer, the trees are finally looking green and as always our allergies are kicking into high gear. Yet as an amateur photographer, capturing the changes in the seasons have been a welcome change compared to my usual urban focus. Spring is also so synonymous with re-birth or nature, that watching the slow flowering around the city has been a beautiful experience.

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Nature up close allergies and all.

The first pictures come from the New York Botanical Garden’s Orchid show. Marking the unofficial start to the season, the theme for this one was orchidelirulm, named for the Orchid mania that swept through Britain during the 19th century. Orchids were extremely popular and remain so to this day as being some of the most diverse flora ever produced on Earth.

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Some of the Orchid’s on display at the Orchid Show 

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Orchids account for an estimated 6-11% of all seed plants in the world. 

 

The second shot is from Sakura Park in Morningside Heights. named for the Japanese word for Cherry Tree, The park bloomed early last month, the first trees were planted in the early twentieth century, and are part of the 20,000 cherry trees planted by the parks department. Some of those can also be found at the Cherry Walk along the West Side Highway.

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Early bloom at Sakura Park with Riverside Church in the background 

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Blossom Close-up 

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Riverside Park Scene

Another shot comes from the Carroll Gardens section of Brooklyn. This one looked in transition between bloom and post bloom greenery. Well you know the old saying, a tree grows in…

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That Classic Brooklyn Tree 

Not to be out done this beautiful shot comes from the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens. Their iconic Cherry Blossom Festival was held last week and the trees along the esplanade bloomed right on time. While I was unable to attend, this shot is the aftermath of all the rain, which has left a beautiful carpet of pink on the grass.

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Inside the Brooklyn Botanical Garden’s Cherry Esplanade

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The Pink Carpet 

The trees next to the Japanese Pavilion trees had bloomed earlier in the month and the one here just hangs lazily next to the pond.

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Hang 10

Lastly, Perhaps my favorite shot are the cherry blossoms from Roosevelt Island. The contrast of the rows of Kwanzan Cherry Trees with the skyline of East Midtown creates one of the city’s most iconic and temporal scenes in the city.

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Cherry Blossom’s with the Ed Koch Queensboro-59th Bridge in the background. 

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Under the canopy. 

Thanks for reading and looking see you soon!

Winter Storm Jonas: The storm to end all storms

As of 7 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, New York’s Central Park, measured 25.1 inches of snow. It’s already the third highest accumulated snowstorm on record. After a week of wondering whether or not we will get such a blockbuster storm, well…

With over 84 million people in its cross-hairs, Winter Storm Jonas, will at the very least will go down in memory as one of the biggest snowstorm to hit the Eastern Seaboard. I will remember it as the storm I took pictures. So here is my collection of great shots. In short I was Ray in the video.

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Looking south on 5th Avenue

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The General Grant National Monument, a.k.a. Grant’s Tomb under a pristine blanket of snowfall

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Grant’s Tomb neighbor, Riverside Church, a bulwark against the maelstrom.

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The former Low Library building under some serious snowfall.

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When in doubt, take the local, which is what most subway lines were today. It was also a way to get around and stay warm.

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Where were you when the blizzard of ’16 hit?

 

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The Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument on 89th Street and Riverside Drive.

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Children of all ages sledding down the hill behind the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument.

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Looking east at West 87th Street.

 

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Crossing 43rd Street in Times Square

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Times Square looks brighter when the weather isolates her from the city. More so than when under normal circumstances.

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Yup that’s me in a misguided attempt to be Mary Tyler Moore. No article of clothing was harming in the making of this picture.

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Citadel of Knowledge

So there you have it. My four hour adventure during Winter Storm Jonas. I hope you enjoyed the gallery. I will be posting a few other shots on Instagram which you can find at ayindestevens and at Twitter at AJStevens50. Till next time friends.

-AJS

Walking Riverside Drive, A “The City I love” project Part 1: Uptown Beginings

The Project

The goal is to walk the entire length of Riverside Drive where possible from Inwood down to the Upper West Side. I’ll try to average one mile per day and try to write or document via photos what I see along the way. Riverside Drive has a very diverse history and exploring it from stem to stern sounds like a fun project. After all, if The New York Times could do it why not me?

The reason why I decided to start from the north and not the south is to in order to get the trickiest part, which is the highway sections out of the way. Also as you head south the Drive gets progressively wealthy as you go along so you get a chance to notice the change in subtle ways. If you choose to head from North to South you may also notice that you are going back in time with much of the northern section predominately 1920-s 1930’s to the southern half which is more late 1800’s inspired. Also Riverside Drive is one of the least altered streets in Manhattan so it will be easier to notice the difference as you walk from one end to the other. If you choose to do this project you don’t have to do all but pick parts of the drive to explore on your own.

So let’s begin.

History

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Riverside Drive during the 1910’s Photo by The American Art Publishing Co.

If Park, Madison, and Fifth Avenue are to the east side of Manhattan island in terms of New York City’s upper crust, then its west side counter parts should include Riverside Drive. A street with a colorful history, with railroad barons, gilded age mansions, trophy wives and of course the ‘Master Builder’ Robert Moses. A man which no neighborhood of this great metropolis was spared, for better or worse from his influence.

Riverside Drive, a byproduct of the creation of Riverside Park is one of the city’s most scenic areas that is often overlooked compared to its flashier neighbor to the east, Central Park. Riverside Park and Riverside Drive were started in the late 19th century as part of the development of the West Side of Manhattan. For much of the 19th century, the area was a hodgepodge of estates, industry and small villages clustered along the Hudson River.

That all changed when Fredrick Law Olmstead, the creator of Central Park was given 191 acres to play with to create a new park in 1872. Essential to the design was the Drive which Olmstead merged with the park plan to create one singular project between the two. Olmstead’s former collaborator, Calvert Vaux did the landscaping for much of the first half of the project. While much of the land was acquired by condemnation, the Hudson River Railroad now acquired by the New York Central  Railroad would remain in place, while the park was developed around it. The first sections of Riverside Drive opened in 1880 and was completed five years later.

In 1911, Riverside Drive was extended further uptown to Audubon Park, now today known as Audubon Terrace with a series of viaducts, the most famous one being just north of Grant’s Tomb.  With the extension, Riverside Drive absorbed Boulevard Lafayette. A planned road from Audubon Park.  Longtime residents, the Grinnell family used their political connections to connect the two roads in order to boost their property values. Which creates a triangle-shaped aberration in the city’s grid.

In fact much of how the park that we see today was given to us was actually by Robert Moses under the West Side Improvement project.  The project, which were the cost of two Hoover Dams, included the grade separation of the railroad and the Henry Hudson Parkway. Perhaps most importantly it practically buried the railroad and created a man-made hill that covers the tracks that is with today. However it should be noted that the Parkway also in certain areas isolates both the park and drive from each other and I will try to document where that has happened.

Part 1: From Dyckman Street to Plaza Lafayette.  

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Tiled mosaic of the Dyckman-200th Street Station

So on a mild Friday afternoon, I set off from my apartment in Washington Heights to the subway to Dyckman Street which is the northern terminus of Riverside Drive. The last address is 1825 Riverside Drive, which reminded me of the Flatiron Building downtown. Opposite the apartment buildings is Fort Tyron Park, which today is home to the Cloisters, an outpost of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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1825 Riverside Drive, the last building on the Drive

On the next block, Riverside Drive merges with the Henry Hudson Parkway, so to continue I returned to Dyckman Street and towards the Hudson River. Once your turn left you will see three bridges. The first, is a concrete arch bridge that instantly reminded me of the art-deco bridges in California. Originally when the Parkway was a four-lane highway, it carried bi-directional traffic. When it was expanded, a second but lower bridge was added. The last bridge is the old Hudson River Railroad which were acquired by the New York Central in the late 1800’s. Today the tracks are now under the use of Amtrak. Its bridges is the lowest of the three. It’s between the latter two bridges that access to the greenway can be found.

 

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The Bridges over Dyckman Street

So for the next mile or so I walked the greenway, with the cars roaring to go upstate on my left and a low stone wall to my right. The path narrow due to the fact that leaves covered up most of the right side of the pathway. So much for staying on that side. Luckily, they weren’t many joggers or bicyclists on the path but I constantly looked behind me, the reason being the road bends a few times so it made sense just to be cautious. The Cloisters came into view and then disappeared under the trees as I headed further south. The park has a massive arch bridge that leads to the Cloisters, the bridge was probably created so that people driving from the parkway can access the museum.

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Cloisters approach and bridge

Further down, there is a massive collection of arches made out of Maine granite situated near the southern end of the park. It is all that left of the grand Billings estate. It served as the driveway to the home, formerly owned by Charles Kingsley Garrison Billings. The driveway alone cost $250,000 and the rest of the house was so grand it would put even the Rockefellers to shame. Sadly, Billings, an avid horseman, grew tired of the house, and sold it to interestingly enough the Rockefellers. Almost immediately, the Rockefellers wanted to give the land to the city and tear down the house. However, lovers of the home and its architecture spared its demolition but not from the laws of nature. In 1925 the house burned to the ground, the Rockefellers again offered the land to the city and this time the city accepted. In 1939 the Cloisters Museum, which was given to the city by John D. Rockefeller Jr. opened to the public. Today only the driveway and lawn of the Estate remains however the driveway is largely cutoff from the park.

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Billings private driveway cars probably drove up to 15 m.p.h. back in the day now cars zoom by at 60, missing the grandeur of years pat.

Not long after seeing the driveway, the lush and parklike aspect of the area gives way to apartments that overlook the river. Also nearby is Inspiration Point, a lookout stop that was designed for motorists to stop, take a break and admire the scenery. Here’s an excerpt from a New York Times article in 1989 discussing the characteristics of the structure.

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Part of the Inspiration Point lookout.

“A two-way drive, it had a wide sidewalk on the river side; this was an environment where the automobile and the pedestrian were meant to mix agreeably. Drivers were encouraged to stop at the roadside in a large turnoff in front of the $150,000 shelter, the last stopping place before the end of the drive at Dyckman Street.”

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View of the GWB from lookout

However, shortly after the completion of the shelter Robert Moses’s planned West Side Improvement project doomed the shelter and it now today, the shelter is now slowly crumbling to nature. 27 years later some things have changed, but it still has the feel of a “picturesque ruin,” as detailed further in the article.

“As the automobile changed from a pleasure vehicle to mere transportation, the pleasure drive lost its patron in road planners. The Miller Elevated Highway (or West Side Highway) below 72d Street of 1931 to 1933 was meant for moving, not inspiring, people. But it was Robert Moses’ Henry Hudson Parkway of 1937 – although an idyll compared to the modern interstate – that made the bed of the old isolated Riverside Drive a through highway, with a bridge crossing the Harlem River.

GRADUALLY, increased traffic turned what had been a walking/driving experience into a no man’s land for pedestrians. The walkway is now overgrown and concrete bumpers now barricade what was the original promenade.

The shelter at Inspiration Point itself now suggests despair. The doors to the toilets are walled up. Cast-stone copings, indeed whole sections of balustrade, have been pushed over, down the steep slope. The rotting wooden roof has miraculously escaped destruction by fire, but whole sections have fallen off or hang precariously at the edge. Water damage has buckled the elegant coffered ceiling and most of what remains looks like driftwood scavanged from a lost civilization.”

 

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Plaque dedicating the ‘Improvement’ to Riverside Drive, little did they know…

 

Up above are art deco apartment buildings built in the 1920’s before the stock market crashed. Also overlooking everything there is a house actually perched over the retaining wall! I wonder how much the insurance is going to cost if the thing falls over.

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No explanation here

The final landmarks that come into view are the George Washington Bridge on the right and the Castle Village apartment complex on the left. The complex, which features five cruciform towers were the basis of the ‘towers in the park’ concept of modernist architecture. The concept was widely reproduced in many of New York City’s housing developments both public and private during the postwar era. Its social effects are still being felt today.

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Castle Village apartments. Completed in the mid 1930’s these apartments were meant to be shelters for Manhattan’s middle class residents back in the day. The more things change the more things stay the same I guess.

 

In 2005 the retaining wall, dividing the property and the ramp leading down to the Parkway collapsed. No one was hurt and the wall was repaired. Today you can see the distinctions between the replacement wall and the original. When I passed by, no vehicles were parked there. However, I think if you’re going to park a car along that wall, it might be the safest place to do so.

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The Castle Village retaining wall the original section is to the right.

The footbridge leads me to Plaza Lafayette and the end of part 1 of the trip. I’ll save the Bridge photos for part 2 of the project. I will continue further south, pass through more Art-Deco structures, see parts of abandoned Riverside Drive access points and deal with that pesky triangle.  Also follow on Instagram with the #WalkRvierside to track my progress.

-AJS