Thought’s on Baseball and Birthday’s: Happy Birthday Jack (Jackie) Roosevelt Robinson

Today is the 98th Birthday of the late great Jackie Robinson. The first African American to play for a major league baseball in 1947. Recruited by Branch Rickey, the general manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers, Robinson’s breaking of the color barrier, which was more an actual unwritten rule and custom due to the racial and social politics of the day, is still considered an momentous achievement in both sports and American history.

A few weeks back I made the pilgrimage to the Robinson’s grave. As a licensed tour guide for the city of New York and as a African American I felt that it was long time coming to pay respects. In fact the road that bisects the cemetery where he lies with his Mother-in-Law and son, was dedicated in 1997 for the 50th anniversary.

So with my good friend John who is in the process to tracking down luminaries of New York baseball we made our way to Cypress Hills Cemetery on the subway. In fact the station, also called Cypress Hills on the J/Z line, literally deposits you within steps of the front entrance.

To find the grave, ask the security guard at the gate for more detailed instructions but I did keep the map the cemetery provides and labeled the easiest route. Also bear in mind that the path’s are not labeled with their corresponding names on the map. If you follow the security’s directions carefully, you can find the site within 10 minutes.

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People have left behind baseballs and bats one I read came as far away as Nashville TN. 

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Follow the Yellow Brick Road?

You will also travel between the boroougs of Brooklyn where the Dodgers used to play, to Queens where the New York Mets, a team many Dodgers fan switched allegiances to after the rather devastating split of the Dodgers leaving Brooklyn for Los Angeles. As recent as 2013, when the current Dodger team was facing strife, their were some old timers who gleefully wished for ‘dem bums’ to return.

The city has a few places that also memorializes Robinson such as the statue of Robinson and Pee Wee Reese from their ’embrace’ in Cincinnati and the hotel he stayed in where he got the call that he had been signed to the Dodgers. That hotel is located in Midtown Manhattan.

I will be updating this post in the coming days and to fill in those locations.

On a final note, Happy Black History Month.

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